Academic Bibliography on Death and Death Practices

  • Bakar, S. H. (2013). Uncovering death practices among the Tamil Hindus in Singapore. Saarbrücken: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.
  • Chan, C. L. W. et al. (2005) ‘The Experience of Chinese Bereaved Persons: A Preliminary Study of Meaning Making and Continuing Bonds’, Death Studies, 29(10), pp. 923–947. doi: 10.1080/07481180500299287.
  • Chong, T. and Chua, A. L. (2014) ‘The Multiple Spaces of Bukit Brown’, in Lim, W. S. W. (ed.) Public Space in Urban Asia. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing, pp. 26–55.
  • Davies, D. (2002). Death, ritual and belief the rhetoric of funerary rites. London: Continuum. (YW)
  • Fearon, J., Belcher-Timme, Barbara, Peterson, Roger, & Slammon, William. (2011). The Technology of Grief: Social Networking Sites as a Modern Death Ritual
  • Grimes, R. (2000). Deeply into the bone. Re-inventing rites of passage. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Grimes, R. (2014). The craft of ritual studies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Han GS. (2019) The Rise, Fraud, and Fall of the Death-Care Industry: Topics and Concerns by Investigative Journalists. In: Funeral Rites in Contemporary Korea. Springer, Singapore
  • Han, G.-S., Forbes-Mewett, H. and Yang Wang, W. (2018) ‘My own business, not my children’s: negotiating funeral rites and the mobility and communication juncture among Chinese migrants in Melbourne’, Mobilities, pp. 1–15. doi: 10.1080/17450101.2018.1471847.
  • Hazariah, S., & Bakar, B. (2015). “12 Changing Funerary Practices of the Tamil Hindus in Singapore”. In 12 Changing Funerary Practices of the Tamil Hindus in Singapore. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill. doi: https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004288065_013
  • Heng, T (2020) Interacting with the dead: understanding the role and agency of spirits in assembling deathscapes, Social & Cultural Geography, DOI: 10.1080/14649365.2020.1744183
  • Hsu, C.-Y., O’Connor, M. and Lee, S. (2009) ‘Understandings of Death and Dying for People of Chinese Origin’, Death Studies, 33(2), pp. 153–174. doi: 10.1080/07481180802440431.
  • Jackson, J. C. (2008). Reforming the dead: The intersection of socialist merit and agnatic descent in a chinese funeral home
  • Katz, Jeanne; Hockey, Jenny and Small, Neil eds. (2001). Grief, Mourning and Death Ritual. Facing Death. Buckingham, UK: Open University Press.
  • Kong, L. (2012) ‘No Place, New Places: Death and its Rituals in Urban Asia’, Urban Studies, 49(2), pp. 415–433. doi: 10.1177/0042098011402231.
  • Lee, Siew-Peng (2003) Managing ‘face’, hygiene and convenience at a Chinese funeral in Singapore, Mortality, 8:1, 48-66, DOI: 10.1080/1357627021000063124
  • Leicester-Rodrigues, Evelyn. (2017). Rites and Festivals: Customs and Practices of Yesteryear Singapore Eurasians: Memories, Hopes and Dreams. 10.1142/9789813109605_0010
  • Li, S. (1993). The funeral and chinese culture. Journal of Popular Culture, 27(2), 113.
  • Lim, Vivian Tsui Shan (1995). Specializing in death: The case of the Chinese in Singapore. Southeast Asian Journal of Social Science, 23 (2), 62-88.
  • Metcalf, P., & Huntington, R. (2014). Celebrations of death: The anthropology of mortuary ritual. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Tan, K. Y. (2013). From the blue windows: Recollections of life in Queenstown, Singapore, in the 1960s and 1970s. Singapore: Ridge Books.
  • Tham, S. C. (1985). Religion and modernization: A study of changing rituals among Singapore’s Chinese, Malays, and Indians. Singapore: Graham Brash
  • Thursby, J. S. (2009). Funeral festivals in America: Rituals for the living. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky.
  • Tong, C. K. (2004) Chinese Death Rituals in Singapore. Leiden: Brill.
  • Tong, C. K. (1989). Trends in traditional Chinese religion in Singapore. Singapore: Ministry of Community Development, p. 35.
  • Tong CK. (2019) Negotiating Traditions and Modernity: Chinese Death Rituals in Singapore. In: Selin H., Rakoff R. (eds) Death Across Cultures. Science Across Cultures: The History of Non-Western Science, vol 9. Springer, Cham. (YW)
  • Topley, M. (1952). Chinese Rites for the Repose of the Soul; with special reference to Cantonese Custom. Journal of the Malayan Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, 25(1 (158)), 149-160. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/41502939
  •  Toulson, R. E. (2013). The meanings of red envelopes: Promises and lies at a Singaporean Chinese funeral. Journal of Material Culture, 18(2), 155–169.
  • Yeoh, B.S.A., 1999. The body after death: Place, tradition and the nation state in Singapore. In: E.K. Teather, ed. 1999. Embodied Geographies: Spaces, Bodies and Rites of Passage. London: Routledge, pp. 240-255.